Live For Live Music & All Good Presents
Umphrey's McGee
Lettuce | @Pier Six Pavilion | view more info »
Jul
19

Live For Live Music & All Good Presents
Umphrey's McGee

Lettuce


Sunday Jul 19|doors 5:30 pm|all ages
Pier Six Pavilion|get directions »
731 Eastern Ave
Baltimore, MD|p: (410) 783-4189


Live For Live Music & All Good Presents
Umphrey's McGee

official band site »

After 16 years of performing over 100 concerts annually, releasing seven studio albums and selling more than 3.3 million tracks online, Umphrey’s McGee might be forgiven if they chose to rest on their laurels and attend to their lives as husbands and fathers. But you’d be wrong. With their eighth studio album, Similar Skin, and first for their own indie label, Nothing Too Fancy (N2F) Music (distributed by RED), the group - which formed on the Notre Dame campus outside of South Bend, Indiana in 1997 - has something to prove. And that’s not just to their ever-loyal fan base, but to those who have never heard a note, or worse - dismiss them as “too sophisticated, too complex” or think they know what Umphrey’s McGee is all about.


Lettuce

official band site »

After celebrating their 20th anniversary as modern day rulers of old school funk, the Brooklyn-based juggernaut Lettuce is not showing any signs of slowing. Having blown up stages from coast to coast last year, ranging from The Fillmore in San Francisco to Terminal 5 in NYC, Bonnaroo to Pemberton and all points in-between, Lettuce is poised to continue their rapid growth throughout 2014.

“We’re more together and set to crush than ever before,” says drummer and chief songwriter Adam Deitch of the all-star group that he and his accomplished band-mates cut their teeth with back in their Berklee School of Music days. That much history, along with the A-list crop of projects that each member has taken on away from Lettuce, gives the group a bottomless well of musical ideas and unrivaled chemistry—in fact, referring to themselves as a band of brothers. “I was in a practice room at 16 with these guys, and it all clicked,” says lead bassist Erick “Jesus” Coomes. “We all felt rhythms in similar ways. We were all about the pocket from day one.”


 
Fly Golden Eagle
@Gypsy Sally's | view more info »
Jul
24

Fly Golden Eagle



Friday Jul 24|doors 7:00 pm|21+
Gypsy Sally's|get directions »
3401 K St NW
Washington DC|p: (202) 333-7700


Fly Golden Eagle

official band site »

Ben Trimble’s musical awakening began in a basement.

No, that simplifies it too much. Ben Trimble’s musical awakening began at birth — raised in Detroit with Kentucky roots, music was always a part of his life, as natural as breathing. His was a religious family, steeped in gospel choirs, honky-tonk keys, and the to-the-rafters twang of the faithful.

But it was in a Nashville basement that Trimble lost himself in rock ‘n’ roll. He found himself working for a music supervisor with a 60,000-strong record collection, and dove headfirst down the rabbit hole. Motown. Blues. Glam rock. Psychedelia. And soon, all of the disparate sources of his inspiration — his lineage, his Detroit roots, his need for expression, the newfound discovery of a musical community in Nashville — slowly began to weave together into the musical tapestry that would become Fly Golden Eagle.

“That was a big part of unlocking music for me, as a means to express myself,” Trimble says. “I realized that there was a long line of people who had expressed rebellion — both serious and casual — through music. They’d done so in different ways and in different parts of the country.”

Trimble’s musical origins are one piece of the puzzle. Bass player Matt Shaw hails from Celeste, Texas. Mitch Jones on the keys is from Knoxville, Tennessee. Richard Harper, drums, hails from Huntsville, Alabama. Each possesses a musical prowess that encompasses technical skill, deep roots, and a whole lot of heart, evident in their playing and performance styles.

And then there’s Trimble, and his downriver Detroit gospel-twang sound.

It’s an “only in Nashville” combination that leads to a new sound, a sum that is equally indebted to all of its parts. Fly Golden Eagle has also stepped up to become power players in the emerging, way-beyond-country Nashville scene — they’ve worked extensively with Adrija Tokic, cut music in The Bomb Shelter, and played on some of the most significant albums representing the new Nashville sound, including Benjamin Booker, Hurray for the Riff Raff, Majestico, and Alabama Shakes.

But while Nashville may be responsible for bringing these musicians together, their sound speaks to a much bigger musical world.

“In Detroit, it’s all about heart,” Trimble says. “There, it does exactly what you as an artist hopes for: it brings people together.”

Trimble is describing these points of influence on the road home from Nashville to Michigan to see his family. Family runs deep here. And the spirit of togetherness, of telling a bigger kind of story, is essential to understanding Fly Golden Eagle’s latest release, Quartz.

“I wanted this album to be a real reflection of the whole band effort, of the vibes of us playing together,” he says. “I want people to listen to it and be able to feel the chemistry.”

This was a definite contrast from Fly Golden Eagle’s previous psych-funk release, Swagger, and Trimble’s project through-and-through.

“It [Swagger] was my thing,” he describes. “Quartz is about something bigger.”

“Bigger” is something of an understatement — try momentous. Quartz is a 26-song epic, a collection of songs that join together to form a narrative arc describing a story that is sometimes vulgar, sometimes profane, and sometimes beautiful. It’s about the psychedelia found in the natural world and it’s a love story.

It’s a work that can stand alone, from the pump-up car chase rhythm of “Tehuacana,” straight out of a ‘70s road movie, to the heart-string twang of “Monolith,” a tender love song inspired by the birth of Trimble’s niece.

Quartz is also meant as an artistic pairing, of sorts — the album lines up with the groundbreaking 1973 film The Holy Mountain, an avant-garde masterpiece directed by Alejandro Jodorowski, produced by The Beatles’ manager Allen Klein, and funded by John Lennon and George Harrison. Trimble found himself inspired by the film while writing the material that would become Quartz. It was not a given that the music and the movie would run in tandem, but as Trimble continued to write, the through-lines of both works matched up, leading to an inspirational set piece of visuals, music, and story.

But to limit Quartz’s point of references to one film would be a disservice to the music, and to band that created it. Quartz is a representation of Fly Golden Eagle itself – the psych-rock-glam-funk-gospel sounds that unify to create a beautiful whole. You’ll hear the stomp-heavy drama of T.Rex and the swirling colors, and textures of The Doors. A growl of punk rock mixed effortlessly with the choral echos of the gospel church. It’s also a reflection of place and the environments in which musical mastery is created. For Quartz, that includes Bomb Shelter and “Lil’ Biv Town” in Nashville; Trimble’s bedroom; a garage in Celeste, Texas; but mainly, Trinity College in Tehuacana, Texas.

The college was abandoned in the ‘40s, but the gorgeous art deco site still has working power, and even functional dorms. The band decamped with girlfriends and friends to record, cook, and create. They set up shop in what was once the library – the space was flooded with natural light, and windows to the surrounding environment. Days were built around the music; nights were for sharing stories over dinner and wine. The fully immersive experience, and the deeply inspirational space, led to the kind of band chemistry that dreams are made of.

This is evident in the power of the overall effort, and the integrity of each individual song. Consider the impact of 12-track Quartz Bijou, a consolidated offering of the longer album effort. Bijou ebbs and flows seamlessly; it’s a deeply satisfying stand-alone musical effort, with the bonus realization that there’s more to be heard and experienced.

Bijou starts out strong, with the cacophonous celebration of “You Look Good to Me,” an exercise in musical layering – from the swath of keys to the slap of bass, Trimble wails a sentiment you soon find yourself relating to: “Oh, it’s all the way to the bones/I can’t fight it.”

The energy never flags. From the stomp-heavy bombast of “Stepping Stone” to the kaleidoscopic Southern swell of “Medicine Hat,” where the nature of Quartz Bijou, and Quartz as a whole, as a necessary journey is solidified: “Moving down the street with no horizon/One way ticket I’ve got nowhere else to go.”

The music is a ride. And it’s one that you should take as often as you can, with the volume turned up. Just say yes to the question posed in slinky seduction of “Horses Mouth:” “I’m never bending to the imitations/ Why don’t you come and take a trip with me?”



 
Jeff Austin Band
@The 8x10 | view more info »
Jul
25

Jeff Austin Band



Saturday Jul 25|doors 8:00 pm|all ages
The 8x10|get directions »
10 E. Cross St.
Baltimore, MD|p: (410) 625-2000


Jeff Austin Band

official band site »

Mandolinist Jeff Austin is unstoppable. He is celebrated for his fleet fingers and penchant for improvisation on stage, but those qualities also speak volumes about how he chooses to live. Austin has cultivated his natural musical abilities and allowed himself to be driven by his boldest instincts. In this way, he has been able to build positive, exciting momentum around his life’s greatest passion.

Austin’s enthusiasm for the vast, vibrant world of music was rooted in him as early as he can remember: “I was always raised very musically. My mom always had music playing; she always sang.” It’s no surprise then that Austin himself grew up singing too. From beginning to end of his years in grade school just outside of Chicago, he sang in classes, choirs, and musicals, allowing his musical influences to lead him where they may. “I started listening to Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings,” Austin says. “And then the Beatles, that turned into Bob Dylan, and then the Grateful Dead and Phish.”

“This is it. This is the band. We’re here and we’re focused,” he says with glee. He’s referring to his handpicked ensemble, featuring long-time collaborator Danny Barnes on banjo and guitar, guitarist Ross Martin, bass player Eric Thorin, and Cody Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars on percussion.

The Simple Truth, the group’s 2015 debut solo album and Austin’s first recording for Yep Roc records, is no simple affair. His legions of fans have long known of Austin’s eclectic musical influences. Here, instead of familiar jam band motifs, listeners will find hints of power pop, country ballads, bluegrass and rock. Assisting the band is an array of acclaimed guests including Todd Snider, Jenn Hartswick, Brendan Bayliss of Umphrey’s McGee and Sarah Siskind.

“I love writing a three-minute song with a hook that would grab a five-hundred-pound marlin as much as I like writing something that goes, ‘okay, after the bridge, it’s going to open up and just go wide.’”

Indeed, “wide” is what Jeff Austin is all about. He wants new and different, complex and interesting. He wants everything the music world has to offer, and he’s willing to work hard to get it.

It’s hard not to notice Austin’s enthusiasm for the new project. “As the primary writer and singer, my name may be attached to the thing, but this is everybody’s band,” he says. “To see the work these guys are doing on a nightly basis, embedding themselves and the dedication to work, it’s ridiculous. It’s a cool thing to be a part of.”



 
The English Beat
@The 8x10 | view more info »
Jul
31

The English Beat



Friday Jul 31|doors 8:00 pm|all ages
The 8x10|get directions »
10 E. Cross St.
Baltimore, MD|p: (410) 625-2000


The English Beat

official band site »

Hailing from working-class Birmingham, England, Dave Wakeling and The English Beat entered the music scene in the troubled times of 1979. When The English Beat rushed on to the music scene it was a time of social, political and musical upheaval. Into this storm came they came, trying to calm the waters with their simple message of love and unity set to a great dance beat.

The six member band consisted of singer/songwriter Dave Wakeling (vocals & guitar), Andy Cox (guitar), David Steele (bass), Everett Morton (drums), Saxa (saxophone) and Ranking Roger (toasting). The band managed to fuse all of their respective musical influences – soul, reggae, pop and punk – into a unique sound that was highly danceable. Along with contemporaries such as The Specials, The Selecter and Madness, The English Beat became one of the most popular and influential bands of the British Two Tone Ska movement.

Over the course of three albums, The English Beat achieved great success in their home country, charting several singles into the top 10. In addition to their UK chart success, in America the band found a solid base of young fans eager to dance to the their hypnotic rhythms and absorb their message of peace, love & unity. Their constant touring with iconic bands such as The Clash and The Police helped to boost their popularity in the States.



 
Rebirth Brass Band
@Rams Head Live | view more info »
Aug
6

Rebirth Brass Band



Thursday Aug 6|doors 8:00 pm|all ages
Rams Head Live|get directions »
20 Market Place
Baltimore, MD|p: (410) 244-1131


Rebirth Brass Band

official band site »

Whether seen on HBO’s Treme or at their legendary Tuesday night gig at The Maple Leaf, Grammy-winning Rebirth Brass Band is a true New Orleans institution. Formed in 1983 by the Frazier brothers, the band has evolved from playing the streets of the French Quarter to playing festivals and stages all over the world. While committed to upholding the tradition of brass bands, they have also extended themselves into the realms of funk and hip-hop to create their signature sound. “Rebirth can be precise whenever it wants to,” says The New York Times, “but it’s more like a party than a machine. It’s a working model of the New Orleans musical ethos: as long as everybody knows what they’re doing, anyone can cut loose.” In the wake of the sometimes-stringent competition among New Orleans brass bands, Rebirth is the undisputed leader of the pack, and they show no signs of slowing down.

Following the Grammy-winning Rebirth of New Orleans, Rebirth Brass Band is at it again with Move Your Body, an infectious, groove-laden collection of hip-shakers sure to saturate the dance floor.

Rollicking originals like "Who's Rockin, Who's Rollin'"? and "Take 'Em to the Moon" reaffirm the band's position as head of the brass throne while the rasta-esque "On My Way" and leave-nothing-to-the-imagination lyrics of "HBNS" showcase the unit's talent for penning unabashed party starters.

Boasting a mastery of Rebirth's signature "heavy funk" sound, Move Your Body pushes and swings, leaving behind an 11 track thumbprint, approved by the Frazier brothers themselves, of a sultry Tuesday night spent dancing on their home court at the Maple Leaf Bar in New Orleans.



 
The Royal Southern Brotherhood
@State Theatre | view more info »
Sep
9

The Royal Southern Brotherhood



Wednesday Sep 9|doors 7:00 pm|18+
State Theatre|get directions »
220 N. Washington st.
Falls Church, VA|p: (703) 237-0300


The Royal Southern Brotherhood

official band site »

“They are not a band – they are an extravaganza” – John Hiatt

This supergoup led by Cyril Neville, bring their brand of blues-rock and white-hot musicianship from the Southern States onto the world stage!



 
ALO
Yojimbo | @The 8x10 | view more info »
Oct
10

ALO

Yojimbo


Saturday Oct 10|doors 8:00 pm|all ages
The 8x10|get directions »
10 E. Cross St.
Baltimore, MD|p: (410) 625-2000


ALO

official band site »

“We’ve never fit into any quickly digestible category,” says ALO’s keyboardist/singer Zach Gill. “It’s just a different kind of experience.”

With its delightfully vibrant blend of inventive musicality and genre-blurring reach, Sounds Like This sees ALO operating with fresh verve and vitality, their always-kaleidoscopic funk pop ‘n roll aglow with exceptionally ebullient songcraft and deliriously danceable grooves. The California-based band’s fourth Brushfire Records release showcases their unfettered passion, wit, and imagination while simultaneously exploring hitherto uncharted musical terrain. Invigorated by an unstructured approach to the studio process, ALO have accessed new avenues of resourcefulness, resulting in a truly distinctive collection of songs that adroitly captures all the glorious ingenuity and adventure of the band’s legendary live sets.

“There has always been a division between the fans that get to know us through our live shows vs. the fans that get to know us through our albums,” guitarist Lebo says. “This album is going to bridge that gap.”


Yojimbo

official band site »

Yojimbo is triple fun! Based out of New Orleans their sound is pure punk rock energy with poppy driven melodies. You’ll be powerless to do anything except dance uncontrollably with a huge grin. Carly Meyers leads the pack down a musical rabbit hole, wielding her trombone like “a mystical samurai sword”. While Doc Sharp hammers the keyboards in cataclysmic pleasure and Adam Gertner beats his drums to a bloody pulp with a deliberate smile.


 
Xavier Rudd & The United Nations
@State Theatre | view more info »
Nov
14

Xavier Rudd & The United Nations



Saturday Nov 14|doors 7:00 pm|18+
State Theatre|get directions »
220 N. Washington st.
Falls Church, VA|p: (703) 237-0300


Xavier Rudd & The United Nations

official band site »

Since the very beginning, Xavier Rudd's ability to connect with people has been his most powerful gift. The more he has toured the world, the more hearts he has touched and the more of the world he has put back into his music. Now, fronting a band aptly named The United Nations, Xavier Rudd has assembled a lineup of musicians from around the world as a one-people musical force. Making their debut in 2015, Xavier Rudd And The United Nations finds the iconic Australian solo artist in full band mode for the first time in a long and successful career, and introduces new album Nanna to Xavier's diverse and acclaimed discography...

Enthralling audiences with his ability to wield so many instruments at once, Xavier's 2002 debut album, To Let, introduced a sound that was a mix of guitars, yidakis (didgeridoos), stomp box and percussion, blues harp and vocals. Something distinctly new, yet tied back through time to the spirit of our ancestors. With a sound established, Xavier's 2004 sophomore album, Solace, was testament to the power of his songwriting abilities. Solace debuted in the top 20 of the ARIA charts and was met as an instant classic; going platinum and earning Xavier two ARIA nominations, with three of its songs – Let Me Be, Shelter and Solace – voted into triple j's Hottest 100.

Only a year later, Xavier was receiving his third ARIA nomination, this time for third album Food In The Belly. Celebrated for Xavier's abilities to effortlessly weave genres together - from the reggae sway of The Mother, to the irresistible tribal jam of Manã - Food In The Belly impacted strongly in Australia and Europe, landing Xavier on the Dutch album charts for the first time. Xavier's gold-selling follow-up, White Moth, continued on this path of international success. Released in 2007 on Epitaph sister label ANTI-, White Moth reached #30 on the US Billboard charts and earned Xavier another ARIA nomination back home.

Nudging ahead of White Moth one spot to peak the ARIA charts at #5, 2008's Dark Shades Of Blue was Xavier's biggest musical departure, yet resulted in massive fan and critical acclaim. Gritty, dark and introspective, the album connected deeply with fans, and reintroduced Xavier as formidable lap steel player. 2010's Koonyum Sun - recorded as trio Xavier Rudd And Izintaba - was a return to lighter shades. Featuring a new sound courtesy of a collaboration with bassist Tio Moloantoa and percussionist Andile Nqubezelo - yet abundant in the blues'n'roots charm of his earliest work - Koonyum Sun brought Xavier Rudd full circle.

Debuting at #2 on the ARIA charts, Xavier's 2012 album Spirit Bird was the triumphant pinnacle of of his entire solo career – capturing the most beautiful aspects of his voice, his songs and his spirit. Led by the wonderfully delicate Follow The Sun, Spirit Bird saw Xavier Rudd yet again tour the world, bringing together old fans and new, regardless of their culture or country of origin. Now, this ability to connect is at the heart of Xavier Rudd And The United Nations – a band with a strong message of all people coming together around the globe to return to spirit, respect the ancient ways and protect the Earth and the very essence of creation.

Mixed by Errol Brown at Tuff Gong Studios, Nanna is Xavier's ninth studio album, but his first with Xavier Rudd And The United Nations... finding one of the great solo artists our time fronting a full band with impeccable results. Once again diving into new musical waters, while still holding true to the music in his heart, Xavier Rudd has added another remarkable milestone to his already epic journey; solidifying his place as one of Australia's greatest artists, activists and spirits.